Skip to main content

Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

Click "More / Share / Borrow" for each clip's source context and citation link. HTML5 compatible browser required

Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Catherine Herridge
Chief Intelligence Correspondent for FOX News Channel
FOXNEWSW 09/24/2015
Herridge: One of the central issues this afternoon has been encryption. Not only by the terrorist browns but the lack of encryption at OPM that allowed the hackers in, and the nation's spy chief says he doesn't have a handle how much data was taken and what was taken, and Admiral Rogers told the committee if China continues its current strategy where they insist they have access to the computers of businesses, whether they're government or whether they're private sector, Rogers said he cannot envision a long-term relationship with China on that basis. Smith: anything from capitol hill on this? Herridge: the chairman of the house homeland security committee who gets regular briefings said the number of affected Americans right now the estimated 21.5 million will go higher because the damage assessments have not concluded.
Catherine Herridge
Chief Intelligence Correspondent for FOX News Channel
FOXNEWSW 09/24/2015
Herridge: There are high-level deliberations by the Obama administration and the intelligence community over how to respond to the OPM breach, given all the evidence points to a Chinese entity, likely backed or trained by the Chinese military, and as you mentioned this week's meeting with the Chinese president is a chance to make clear these breaches will not be tolerated. McCaul: I think the reason why you have these discussions with world leaders is to also call to their attention problems we have, and this is on a security level a huge breach that has had no response and no consequence, and I would implore the President to raise these issues when he meets with him. Herridge: The current and former intelligence officials argue when you take the OPM data, the fingerprint data and health care records you have everything you need to create a composite government worker that you can impersonate. There's really nothing left to get in terms of the data. So that's why some kind of retaliation may not be that meaningful at this point.
Edward Snowden
U.S. Senator (I- Vermont)
WNBC 09/24/2015
And Edward Snowden will be speaking out, but it will be here in New York and he’ll be doing it by satellite from Moscow. Snowden is planning to urge leaders meeting at the U.N. to pass a new international treaty. It would protect whistle blowers and oppose government surveillance. Snowden's release of secret NSA documents revealed the extent of intelligence gathering by the U.S.
Edward Snowden
U.S. Senator (I- Vermont),
LINKTV 09/25/2015
Goodman: NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Glenn Greenwald and other privacy activists have launched a new campaign to establish global privacy standards. The proposed international treaty on the right to privacy, protection against improper surveillance and protection of whistleblowers would require states to ban mass data collection and implement public oversight of national security programs. The treaty would also require states to offer asylum to whistleblowers. It is being dubbed the "Snowden treaty." Edward Snowden spoke about the need for the treaty via teleconference from Russia at Thursday’s launch in New York. Snowden: This is not a problem exclusive to the United States or the national security agency or the FBI or Department of Justice or any agency of government anywhere. This is a global problem that affects all of us.
Amy Goodman
U.S. Senator (I- Vermont),
LINKTV 09/25/2015
Goodman: Meanwhile, the intercept has published new documents leaked by Snowden revealing a British mass surveillance operation known as
Hari Sreenivasan
U.S. Senator (I- Vermont),
KQED 09/26/2015
Sreenivasan: For years, the British government has reportedly tracked and stored billions of records of internet use by British citizens and people outside the U.K., in an effort to track every visible user on the internet. That finding comes from the “Intercept” website, which is publishing findings from national security agency contractor Edward Snowden's leak on government surveillance practices.
Ryan Gallagher
Reporter for The Intercept
KQED 09/26/2015
Sreenivasan: first of all, explain the scale of surveillance that was happening from the British equivalent of the N.S.A., the G.C.H.Q. Gallagher: well, the scale is quite phenomenal. I mean, it's hard to translate it when you just see the numbers. but you're talking about 50 to 100 billion metadata records of phone calls and e-mails and other communications every single day, so vast, vast quantities of information they're sweeping up. And they're talking by 2030 having in place the world's largest surveillance system, surpassing even what the N.S.A. In the U.S. has built
Ryan Gallagher
Reporter for The Intercept
KQED 09/26/2015
Gallagher: One of the interesting parts of the story we just put out is that we had a bunch of specific cases where, for example, we had monitored something like 200,000 people from something like 185 different countries, so almost every country in the world who had listened to radio shows through their computer. In one case they actually decided to pick out just one of these people, it seems like at random, what web sites he had been viewing. It's kind of an all-seeing system when you're gathering that amount of information, there’s going to be something in there on almost everyone. So that's something that does have an impact and effects on all of us. Sreenivasan: The G.C.H.Q. has much more lax oversight than even the N.S.A. What are they doing with this information? You in your article you pointed to a couple of cases of almost corporate espionage.
Ryan Gallagher
Reporter for The Intercept
KQED 09/26/2015
Gallagher: We have the case where they were monitoring people listening to internet radio shows. There are a couple of other really fascinating and important case where's they've used this information to—into major European telecommunications companies. The reason they did that is they wanted to get into these companies’ systems and steal information they held in their systems because that would help them spy on other people. Also, in these cases, they caused, these amounted to major cyber attacks, cyber attacks in Europe on allied countries, companies in allied countries causing millions of dollars in Euro currency damage and so, you know, the ramifications are quite severe, even in terms of the European union, for what the U.K. agency is doing in Europe.
Edward Snowden
U.S. Senator (I- Vermont),
BLOOMBERG 09/29/2015
Johnson: Edward Snowden is on twitter. The former NSA government contractor turned whistleblower tweeted out his first tweet this morning, saying
Showing 1681 through 1690 of 1708